Subtrochanteric, Iliopectineal and Iliopsoas Bursitis and Synovitis  in Vancouver

Subtrochanteric, Iliopectineal and Iliopsoas Bursitis and Synovitis are common locations for irritation and inflammation of the bursa that is intended to reduce friction. They are all surrounding the hip joint and pelvis and can lead to chronic pain and discomfort if not treated.

Itis = inflammation

Synovitis is the medical term for inflammation of a synovial membrane, which line those joints which possess cavities, namely synovial joints. The condition is usually painful, particularly when the joint is moved. The joint usually swells due to fluid collection. Synovitis is the medical term for inflammation of a synovial membrane, which line those joints which possess cavities, namely synovial joints. The condition is usually painful, particularly when the joint is moved. The joint usually swells due to fluid collection. Synovitis is a risk in several forms of arthritis as well as lupus, gout, and other conditions. Synovitis is one part of distinguishing rheumatoid arthritis from other forms of arthritis, although it can be found mildly in Osteoarthritis. Long term occurrence of synovitis can result in degeneration of the joint. A recent study has shown that so called "lock-ups", where all joints in the body become tense, are related to a large amount of facial piercings.

Bursitis is the inflammation of one or more bursae (small sacs) of synovial fluid in the body. The bursae rest at the points where internal functionaries, such as muscles and tendons, slide across bone. Healthy bursae create a smooth, almost frictionless functional gliding surface making normal movement painless. When bursitis occurs, however, movement relying upon the inflamed bursa becomes difficult and painful. Moreover, movement of tendons and muscles over the inflamed bursa aggravates its inflammation, perpetuating the problem.

Have your questions answered by Dr. Michael Horowitz by calling 604-737-3668 or by filling out the form below. He will respond promptly.

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