Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome in Vancouver

The Tarsal Tunnel (flexor retinaculum) is found along the inner leg behind the medial malleolus.  The tarsal tunnel is made up of bone on the inside and the flexor retinaculum on the outside.  The tibial nerve, a major artery, veins, and tendons travel in a bundle along this pathway, through the tarsal tunnel.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome is a painful foot condition in which the tibial nerve is impinged and compressed as it travels through the tarsal tunnel. Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome (TTS) is also known as Posterior Tibial Nerve Neuralgia. TTS is a compression syndrome of the tibial nerve within the Tarsal Tunnel. This tunnel is found along the inner leg behind the medial malleolus (bump on the inside of the ankle). The posterior tibial nerve, a major artery, veins, and tendons travel in a bundle along this pathway, through the Tarsal Tunnel. In the tunnel, the nerve splits into three different paths. One nerve (calcaneal) continues to the heel, the other two (medial and lateral plantar nerves) continue on to the bottom of the foot. The Tarsal Tunnel is made up of bone on the inside and the flexor retinaculum on the outside.

Have your questions answered by Dr. Michael Horowitz by calling 604-737-3668 or by filling out the form below. He will respond promptly.

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